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Brian Boucher
BBoucher.jpg
Born January 2, 1977 (1977-01-02) (age 42)
Woonsocket, Rhode Island
Height 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight 200 lb (91 kg; 14 st 4 lb)
Position Goaltender
Catches Left
Played for Philadelphia Flyers
Phoenix Coyotes
HV71
Calgary Flames
Chicago Blackhawks
Columbus Blue Jackets
San Jose Sharks
Carolina Hurricanes
EV Zug
National team Flag of the United States.svg United States
NHL Draft 22nd overall, 1995
Philadelphia Flyers
Playing career 1997–2013

Brian Boucher (born on January 2, 1977) is an American former professional ice hockey goaltender who played 13 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Philadelphia Flyers.

He is currently a television analyst for the Philadelphia Flyers. Boucher also currently works as a game and studio analyst on national NBCSN (and NBC) games. In addition to NBCSN, Boucher is also a studio analyst for NHL Network.

He currently holds the NHL's modern record for the longest shutout streak at 3:32:01 set while he was a member of the Phoenix Coyotes during the 2003-04 NHL season.

Playing CareerEdit

Philadelphia FlyersEdit

Brian was drafted by the Philadelphia Flyers in the first round (22nd overall) of the 1995 NHL Entry Draft. He began playing with the Flyers during the 1999–2000 season, taking the starting position from veteran John Vanbiesbrouck and helped the team secure the Eastern Conference and Atlantic Division regular season titles while leading the NHL in goals against average at 1.91. In the playoffs, he backstopped his team to the Eastern Conference Finals. Along the way, Brian recorded several memorable moments including a five-overtime victory against the Pittsburgh Penguins and a sprawling save against Patrik Elias of the New Jersey Devils. Although the Flyers were ahead 3-1 in the Eastern Conference Finals against the Devils and despite the return of the injured Eric Lindros, he and the Flyers lost in seven games to the eventual Stanley Cup champion New Jersey Devils. In 2000–01, a weak start saw him lose his starting position to Roman Cechmanek.

On July 1, 2009, Brian agreed to a two-year contract with the Philadelphia Flyers to be the steady, veteran backup to the starting goaltender Ray Emery. When Emery was hurt midway through the season, he was thrust into the spotlight with mediocre results. A hand injury soon pushed Brian to the sideline, and he was replaced by third-string goaltender Michael Leighton. Leighton excelled in Boucher's absence and once he was healthy, Brian found himself backing up Leighton. Upon the return of Emery, he was further demoted to the press box, with Leighton now the backup. After Emery re-injured himself again, Brian was given another chance to back-up Leighton who was once again playing well. Near the end of the season though (with only 13 games left), Leighton went down with a high-ankle sprain and Brian was back into the spotlight for the Flyers once again. After a 2-1 shootout victory in the final game of the season against the New York Rangers, he and the Flyers advanced to the playoffs. In the 2010 Stanley Cup Playoffs, Brian beat Martin Brodeur and the New Jersey Devils in the first round by a margin of 4–1. The national media remarked that he was the surprise of the playoffs after the first round with his outstanding play in net. The Flyers defeated the Boston Bruins in the second round by overcoming an 0-3 game deficit, but he was injured in Game 5 of that series with knee injuries. Brian returned from his injuries to serve as a backup to Michael Leighton in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Finals against the Chicago Blackhawks. He saw game action in Game 1 and Game 5 in relief of Leighton, but Philadelphia lost in 6 games to Chicago.

In the 2010–11 season, Brian split time in goal with standout rookie Sergei Bobrovsky after Leighton was demoted to the AHL in part for hiding an injury. Bobrovsky started most of the games and was named the Flyers playoff starter. After game 2 of the conference quarterfinals against the Buffalo Sabres in which he relieved Bobrovsky and earned the win. Brian started the next 3 games, but was pulled in Game 5 for Leighton, who was called up as a 3rd goaltender. Leighton played well, but lost Game 5 in overtime, nonetheless earning the start for Game 6. In Game 6, Leighton allowed 3 goals in the opening period, but once again Boucher was able to earn the win in relief, making Brian the only goaltender in NHL history to record two wins in a playoff series when coming in relief. He went on to start Game 7, as Philadelphia defeated Buffalo. He started the first 3 games in the next round against Boston, but played poorly, allowing for the deposed starter Bobrovsky to return in Game 4 as the Flyers were swept.

On January 13, 2013 (after the 2012–13 NHL lockout), Brian began his fourth stint in the Flyers' organization when he and defenseman Mark Alt were traded to Philadelphia in exchange for Luke Pither. Three days later, he was waived and sent down to Adirondack, the new home of the AHL Phantoms. Brian was named the team's starting goaltender, relegating previous starter Scott Munroe to backup duty and sending Phantoms backup Cal Heeter to the Trenton Titans, the Flyers' ECHL affiliate. On February 10, 2013, he was recalled by the Flyers after Michael Leighton suffered a lower body injury. On March 9, 2013, Brian saw action in four games before being sent back down to Adirondack after Leighton returned to health.

Career StatisticsEdit

Season Team League GP W L T OTL MIN GA SO GAA SV%
1993–94 Mount St. Charles Mounties RIIL 15 14 0 1 504 8 9 0.57
1994–95 Wexford Raiders MTJHL 8 425 23 0 3.25
1994–95 Tri-City Americans WHL 35 17 11 2 1969 108 1 3.29
1995–96 Tri-City Americans WHL 55 33 19 2 3183 181 1 3.41 .913
1996–97 Tri-City Americans WHL 41 10 24 6 2458 149 1 3.64 .901
1997–98 Philadelphia Phantoms AHL 34 16 12 3 1901 101 0 3.19 .888
1998–99 Philadelphia Phantoms AHL 36 20 8 5 2061 89 2 2.59 .911
1999–00 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 35 20 10 3 2038 65 4 1.91 .918
1999–00 Philadelphia Phantoms AHL 1 0 0 1 65 3 0 2.77 .903
2000–01 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 27 8 12 5 1470 80 1 3.27 .876
2001–02 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 41 18 16 4 2295 92 2 2.41 .905
2002–03 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 45 15 20 8 2544 128 0 3.02 .894
2003–04 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 40 10 19 10 2364 108 5 2.74 .906
2004–05 HV71 SEL 4 0 4 0 235 13 0 3.32 .884
2005–06 Phoenix Coyotes NHL 11 3 6 0 512 33 0 3.87 .877
2005–06 San Antonio Rampage AHL 6 2 3 0 345 8 0 1.39 .950
2005–06 Calgary Flames NHL 3 1 2 0 182 15 0 4.95 .854
2006–07 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 15 1 10 3 827 45 1 3.26 .884
2006–07 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 3 1 1 0 142 9 0 3.80 .866
2007–08 Philadelphia Phantoms AHL 42 23 16 1 2288 94 4 2.47 .917
2007–08 San Jose Sharks NHL 5 3 1 1 238 7 1 1.76 .932
2008–09 San Jose Sharks NHL 22 12 6 3 1291 47 2 2.18 .917
2009–10 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 33 9 18 3 1742 80 1 2.76 .899
2009–10 Adirondack Phantoms AHL 1 1 0 0 60 2 0 2.00 .935
2010–11 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 34 18 10 4 1885 76 0 2.42 .916
2011–12 Carolina Hurricanes NHL 10 1 6 1 546 31 0 3.41 .881
2012–13 Adirondack Phantoms AHL 16 6 8 1 910 39 0 2.57 .905
2012–13 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 4 0 2 0 144 6 0 2.50 .891
2013–14 EV Zug NLA 5 309 14 0 2.72 .925
NHL totals 328 120 139 30 15 18219 822 17 2.71 .901
AHL totals 136 68 47 9 2 7630 336 6 2.64 .915
WHL totals 131 60 54 10 7610 438 3 3.45

Playoff StatisticsEdit

Season Team League GP W L MIN GA SO GAA SV%
1994 Mount St. Charles Mounties RIIL 4 4 0 180 6 1 1.20
1995 Tri-City Americans WHL 13 6 5 795 50 0 3.77
1996 Tri-City Americans WHL 11 6 5 653 37 2 3.40
1998 Philadelphia Phantoms AHL 2 0 0 30 1 0 1.94 .944
1999 Philadelphia Phantoms AHL 16 9 7 947 45 0 2.85 .906
2000 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 18 11 7 1183 40 1 2.03 .917
2001 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 1 0 0 37 3 0 4.86 .824
2002 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 2 0 1 88 2 0 1.37 .939
2009 San Jose Sharks NHL 1 0 0 2 0 0 0.00
2010 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 12 6 6 656 27 1 2.47 .909
2011 Philadelphia Flyers NHL 9 4 4 422 22 0 3.13 .904
NHL totals 43 21 18 2388 94 2 2.36 .911
AHL totals 18 9 7 977 46 0 2.82 .908
WHL totals 24 12 10 1448 87 2 3.60

International StatisticsEdit

Year Team Event   GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA
1996 United States WJC 4 3 1 0 220 13 0 3.55
1997 United States WJC 6 4 1 1 357 9 2 1.51
Junior int'l totals 10 7 2 1 577 22 2 2.29

Awards & AchievementsEdit

WHL Awards

  • 1995–96: (West) Second All-Star Team
  • 1996–97: (West) First All-Star Team
  • 1996–97: Del Wilson Trophy (WHL Goaltender of the Year)

International Awards

  • 1997: All-Star Selection, IIHF World Junior Hockey Championships

AHL Awards

  • 1998: Calder Cup (AHL championship) with Philadelphia Phantoms

NHL Awards

  • 1999–2000: NHL All-Rookie Team
  • 1999–2000: GAA leader (1.91)
  • Player of the Week (October 29-November 4, 2001)

RecordsEdit

  • Modern day NHL record with five consecutive shutouts in 2003–04.

Personal LifeEdit

Brian attended St. Charles Academy in high school. He & his wife Melissa have two children: a son named Tyler (born in January of 2003) and a daughter named Brianna (born in December of 2004).